App of the Day: Console

ConsoleI currently work as a Quality Engineer at Palantir Technologies. I do a lot of feature and product testing. As a result, one of the most common tools for testing is the POSIX tool tail.

Linux/Unix/Mac users may be familiar with tail. In layman terms, tail allows you to grab a number of lines at the end of a text based file. In testing, we use tail -f <filename> a lot because the “f” option immediately and automatically updates the CLI with the most recently written lines of text in the file you are tailing. Testers love this because they like to see the stack traces printed on their screen the moment something errors in a program or system. Many development environments have consoles built in for errors and system printing and logging (think Eclipse, NetBeans, etc.). Java based programs also have the option of having the Java console automatically open when you run a Java based program.

On my Windows box at work, I use Cygwin to run the tail command. Cygwin is a Linux-like environment for Windows that allows users to port software running on POSIX systems (such as Linux, BSD, and Unix systems) to Windows. On my Mac, I just use Terminal. However, more recently I’ve discovered an even greater tool called Console. Console actually comes as a pre-installed utility with the Mac OS X operating system. I’ve found that the Utilities folder is full of great (whadoyaknow!) utility apps. I suggest you take a gander through that folder if you haven’t already. I’ve used the Grapher app in my ECON 110 class this semester a couple times (back when I used to take notes on my computer; I’ve since switched to paper since we do more graphing than anything else. Which reminds me about a great note taking app for iPad called Notes Plus. Alas, I digress. I will save that discussion for another post.).

The reason I love Console most, is because you can tell it to bounce in the dock when stack traces print to it. You don’t have to have it open on a second monitor so it’s always visible, or worse yet peaking out on the side of the screen behind the program you are testing. Better yet, you can actually choose to have it come to the forefront for a limited amount of time (say 5 seconds) and then disappear in the background again. I’ve searched for something like this on Windows and haven’t seen anything like it. Probably because there are IDE’s and stuff, but regardless, it’s a beaut. It has other great functions for console type stuff too. Check it out if you’re a tester or programmer. It might be pretty handy.

Console for Mac OS X